Books & Reading

Opening line: The Luck of the Bodkins

“Into the face of the young man who sat on the terrace of the Hotel Magnifique at Cannes there had crept a look of furtive shame, the shifty, hangdog look which announces that an Englishman is about to talk French.”

The Luck of the Bodkins by P.G. Wodehouse, 1935

 

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With Terry Pratchett, so much happens and happens so delightfully that a summary takes away the fun of reading. So, all I can say is: almost-16-year-old witch, Tiffany Aching, the hag o’ the hills, is accompanied by tiny, invisible, high strung, ale-guzzling, chaos-causing, half-men half-dwarves, as she takes on a witch hunter from the 16th century, and discovers love along the way. Crivens!

Book Review

Book Review: I Shall Wear Midnight by Terry Pratchett

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This murder mystery comedy is a great summer novel! In New Delhi, the perennial battle between superstition and rationalism claims another victim. Enter private detective Vish Puri, the Indian Poirot. An unlikely hero, the pot-bellied Puri navigates the slippery terrains of Indian society with a bagful of tried and tested tricks. Encounter all manner of Indian eccentricities, from laughing clubs and charlatan gurus to the Indian penchant for nonsense nicknames (Tea Cup? Door Stop?). Tarquin Hall captures the sights, sounds and quirks of India with obvious affection, and made an endearing and unexpected mystery out of it.

Book Review

Book Review: Case of the Man Who Died Laughing by Tarquin Hall

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